Tiny House, Tiny Living, The Tiny Life.

Archive for 2010

Subsidize This

Interesting infographic on how much the US government subsidizes various energy sources.  I was disappoint not to see nuclear or coal on this, it gets a bit confusing when estimating these because it seems to come in large chunks when new legislation comes in.

Click image below to see larger version

Tokyo Apartment Video Tour

I was sent this neat video from a reader (Thanks Maria!) of a Tokyo Apartment.  I often look to what Asia and Europe are doing in terms of living space because they have been living in such small spaces for a very long time.  Americans are pretty new to the game, or at least we have moved away from it.


TheTinyLife Featured on Creative Loafing

Hey all, some exciting news, TheTinyLife was featured on Creative Loafing.  Many of you might not be familiar with it, it is in 5 or so cities on the East coast, it is our free alternative newspaper.  For the Charlotte location, its a pretty well read publication.


Most of us have too much space and too much stuff, both of which lead to too much responsibility. Think about it: You have to manage your stuff. First, you have to get a good price for it — then you have to find a place for it, care for it, keep it from falling apart, store it and, eventually, dispose of it. Multiply those responsibilities by all of the possessions in your life and you’re not going to have much time for anything else other than stuff-management. That’s not even counting all of the energy and resources that went into creating, packaging, shipping, storing and selling your stuff before you bought it. It’s this type of realization that has helped spur the tiny house movement, where people are building and living in houses smaller than most of the rooms in our houses.

Read the full article here

Baby Quail

Three years ago I set a goal for myself to start growing most of my own food.  Many of you might remember this past summer when I got my chickens, I had put up some post about them (see them here).  Well now they are almost full grown and soon to lay eggs.

I then learned of quail which have a few unique attributes that really appealed to me.  In my journey to grow my own food, I have set another goal to design everything to minimize work put in, maximize what I get out, to integrate ergonomics, set the stage to ramp up production in the event of a long term crisis (think Katrina) and develop a high level of diversity.

Quail does all these things, they are raised in a square foot per bird, are able to be kept on wire without harm (so dropping simply pass through the mesh) to minimize cleaning, they are prolific breeders laying 300 eggs a year, and I have two species of birds to add to my chickens, making a higher diversity.

Oh did I mention they’re really cute?

Egg House

This is a pretty neat house, built by Daihai Fei, age 24, he did it for only $960 US dollars.  He had moved to Beijing to pursue his college degree, but after graduating he found to get work, he must stay in the city, but he couldn’t afford rent.  The house is mobile and covered with bags of dirt and grass seeds.  Daihai Fei hopes that the seed will take and grow to fully encase his egg in grass, making it more weather resistant.

His egg house is now located across the street from his work, so commute is a 30 second walk.  I was surprised that you could pull this off in Beijing, I would think in a modern city they wouldn’t allow it.  But Daihai Fei has become something of a local legend, so perhaps winning the hearts of people has allowed him to do this.  After living in his egg house for two months Daihai Fei feel that his life has improved dramatically since living in his egg house.

Via

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